why homeschooling is a problem

by TYNISHA MONROE
(DETROIT MICHAGAN)

Although I am completely biased towards homeschooling, I like to keep my website well-rounded, which means I allow submissions from many different people, with different viewpoints. Here's a submission I received today. Feel free to respond, but please be kind! Enjoy...


I think home schooling is a problem because some of your parents mite not have finish school but you are getting teached by some one who do not no anything it would be bad on your reputation.because basically you are getting put and the same perdicument theyare and and like you are not to no anything is free why not get regular school why you can? you also would not get a socalarship so basically you are doing all that for nothing. would you want some one try to teach you something that they dont no for sure? no i dont think so i also think that it should be a law that your children should not be alloud homeschool unless you have a dagree. i also think that homeschool should be alloud to children who is somehting wrong with medical problems like bad conditions and you no that they should be by your side

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Mar 02, 2009
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Thoughts About Homeschooling
by: Anonymous

I only know from my situation, so I can only respond for us. I am not trying to be mean or argumentative, just share our thoughts about homeschooling. :)

First, I like home education, because we can work at our own pace. No more hearing "they're not old enough for that". For instance, my 9 year old is in a 7th grade curriculum with her sisters, and she refuses to do anything they aren't doing. She feels anything less is "baby work" and is beneath her. As a result, she works along side of them learning everything they learn, whether it's algebra, geometry, presidents, science/biology, comparative religions, evolution vs creationism, or whatever else we're working on. Today they have a Planet Earth video to watch (science) and a war video (history). All three of my children tested from 95%-98% on the fifth grade standardized test. My youngest at the time was supposed to be in second grade.

I also put a lot of emphasis on reading, speaking well, and proper spelling. If they wrote something like "mite" instead of "might", they would have to write that down a couple of time so they know how to write it properly. My girls each have their own strengths, so the one who enjoys spelling is happy to help the one who doesn't enjoy it. For instance, "How do you spell 'might' as in 'Those that might not have finished school?'" The other girl will yell out the answer and then will thank her for helping.

They understand proper grammar like, "You are getting taught by someone who doesn't know anything." If someone makes a mistake, we listen to what the person said and then point out, "It's not, 'You are getting teached by some one who do not no anything'." Sure we might make some typos while we are typing something up quickly, but I help the girls understand that they have to proof read to eliminate as many of them as possible. We are even more careful when we are writing letters to people so that our writing is neat, legible, and well written. All thoughts must be conveyed in a clear manner so other people can understand us.

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Mar 02, 2009
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Thoughts About Homeschooling
by: Anonymous

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There are many places that a home educated child can go for scholarships. Not only that, but some even take college courses in high school. There are several places online that you can take free courses from, and I would take advantage of them right now if my girls were old enough to take part in those advanced classes. Further, not every home educated child wishes to go to college, like not every public schooled child chooses to go to college, so home education leaves more time to pursue their individual interests. If they want to pursue a career in animal studies, they can take more field trips to the zoo or aviary, do lessons tailored more around animals like "4 zebras + 10 gazelles = ?" or anatomy of those animals. In fact, we have enjoyed dissection owl pellets and seeing the bones of mice, one of my children loved watching the presidential debates and talking to me about the issues, and they love to volunteer with the elderly at the nursing home.

There are also videos that help us out. I am not very good in math, so I rented some Netflix videos that have a real teacher teaching a class. We can work at our own pace, and we have a wonderful lesson to help us learn what we needed to know. I work along side of the girls, helping them interpret the video and work out additional problems on our own. In our house, there is nothing that we have a problem with, because there are thousands of videos that bring the knowledge right to us, the internet to explore every conceivable subject, and thousands of places in life to learn the information from. When we had a plumber here, for example, my girls were full of questions about why they do what they do, how it works, etc. One time we were walking home, and the girls were curious about the road construction crew. I asked one of them if he had a minute to talk, and he kindly told the girls how they were fixing the road. If he didn't have a minute, we would have called someone when we got home. One time we watched a crew cut down a diseased tree and remove it. My girls learned why the barriers marked off proper distance, how they kept themselves safe, all about how termites damage trees, and more.

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Mar 02, 2009
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Thoughts About Homeschooling
by: Anonymous

(continued)

There are people with degrees in public schools, and yet there are people who can't write a legible sentence like "Children should not be allowed to homeschool unless you have a degree". There are people graduating from public schools that cannot read or do basic math. There are people who cannot name 10 countries of the world, don't know Africa is a continent not a country, can't name 10 presidents of the US, don't know about the American Revolution, and don't have the desire to learn more. In contract, my children are on a high school level in several things such as math and reading, and they are technically in elementary school. They enjoy learning, and they are always asking for more books. Did you know that Thomas Jefferson didn't have a formal education? He wrote the Declaration of Independence by reading hundreds of books. Did you know that President Johnson learned to read when his wife taught him as an adult? http://www.americanpresidents.org/presidents/president.asp?PresidentNumber=17

Homeschoolers have become artists and athletes, like Claude Monet and the Williams sisters. They have become authors and businessmen like Charles Dickens and Andrew Carnegie. They were accomplished composers and entertainers like Mozart and Lewis Armstrong. They were explorers, inventors, and leaders like Clark, the Wright brothers, Patton, and several presidents. There were scientists, statesmen, and Supreme Court Judges like Pierre Curie, Winston Churchill, and Sandra Day O'Connor. And that list continues to add famous names as people continue to enjoy the benefits of homeschooling like John Travolta and Kelly Preston and Will and Jada Pinkett Smith homeschool their children.
http://www.successful-homeschooling.com/famous-homeschoolers.html

There is overwhelming evidence of the benefits of homeschooling, such as in the study "Homeschooled and Now Adults". Just as children learned alongside of their parents thousands of years ago, so too do our children. Public schooling is only about 200 years young, while children have been learning the trades of their parents since the beginning of man thousands of years ago. We don't have to endure bullying and violence, inept and apathetic teachers, sub par curriculum, etc. We can learn at our own pace, no matter how fast that is, and review materials as necessary to ensure we know them well.


Mar 02, 2009
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Thoughts About Homeschooling
by: Anonymous

(continued)

Five years ago, there were a lot of people who said I was crazy and stupid for home educating my children when the public school system here was failing my children. Now I have those same people talking about how wonderfully we have done and how well my girls are doing. Those same naysayers are singing our praises and talking about how much my girls are excelling in every area, because I have the time and dedication to ensure that they have an excellent education. Our only problem has been going too fast, when I accidentally got high school videos we weren't ready for. We didn't understand everything the teacher was saying, so we sent it back and reviewed algebra some more before we move on to geometry again. (Still, the tangent walk was nice, and we learned a lot about angles and segments, measuring, etc.)

If you doubt homeschooling, all you have to do is look at a successful family like mine and see that there really is no comparison to a failing public school system. Instead of speaking against home educators who are doing so well, why not work to fix the broken school system that we escaped from and that is still failing hundreds of thousands of children? :)

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/stossel/story?id=1500338

Mar 03, 2009
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THANK YOU
by: Leslie Murphy

Thank you so much for such a well written letter supporting home schooling. You have stated my feelings 100% accurately. I am homeschooling three of my grandchildren because the "school system" let them down so terribly. My daughter is also homeschooling her three girls, so that makes six students, two sets of parents and one set of grandparents that are in total support of educating our children ourselves in order to be sure that these children do have a decent education. I really hope that more parents get involved and join in to make sure that their children are not being left behind.

Mar 03, 2009
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Is this person even REAL?
by: Anonymous

I think most of what needs to be said has been said above, and very eloquently. I am not feeling so polite, just mostly annoyed with the ignorance.

I am not even sure I believe this person is real. Or that she isn't a ten year old child with really poor spelling skills.
My 8 year old homeschooler can spell the name of the state we live in. And most of the other words in which you butchered to absolute death.

You really shouldn't go pitching your opinions against homeschooling unless you've got the capability to do so without exposing how completely and totally INadequate YOUR *school* education must have been. LOL, all you've done is further my confidence that I am educating my child better than the below average school down the street! Seriously, are we sure this person is not some bored juvenile?

Bah, how totally annoying......why do I respond???? WHY?

Mar 03, 2009
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Yes, Unfortunately It's For Real
by: Heather

I agree with you and thank you for your input. I allowed this post to go through as an example of the ignorance of individuals. If it was left by an anonymous person, I would have deleted it, but was thoroughly humored by the grammatical errors by the poster and that she included her name, which was nice and city... whoops!

This person is from my state, spelled Michigan. :) I thought it was interesting that she is most likely a product of the Detroit Public Schools. Could be wrong on that one, but Detroit takes the cake when it comes to the worst school district in the US.

Check this doc out. Page nine... Detroit has a 24.9 graduation rate!

Cities in Crisis

Last year I visited Rep Sander Levin (D) in Washington, DC and his aid told me that Rep Levin is not against homeschooling, but he would never support it. He added that the only thing that Rep Levin wanted was for homeschoolers to meet the standards of the public schools. :)

If nothing else, these kinds of posts provide real-life and free language arts lessons for your homeschooled kids. Print it out and enjoy a free lesson, compliments of Tynisha!

Mar 03, 2009
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RE: Crisis
by: mrsncook

I agree about the cities in crisis. It's really sad that schools are failing like they are. In PA the statewide proficiency is no higher than 64% in reading and math, and many are far below that. The high school down the street is 16% proficiency in reading/math, which is absolutely appalling.

The school district just spent a lot of money putting out brochures about The Pittsburgh Promise where students who attend a Pittsburgh Public School from 9th-12th grades and maintain a 2.0 GPA or higher can get scholarship money. http://www.pittsburghpromise.org/ I was surprised to see that they didn't require a B or higher, and I was surprised that they spent all of that money trying to make the district look good when they could have spent that money improving schools.

That's why I said that I think people who are so against homeschooling should put that time and energy where it is needed in helping public schools to succeed. Home educators are consistently outperforming public schoolers, and public schools in many areas are consistently failing. Instead of attacking home education because they don't know much about it, they should be attacking the failing schools that are letting hundreds of thousands of children down each year.


By the way, I noticed my above posts didn't have my name on them. I am mrsncook, and I rated this thread a 3. (While I understand that the original poster had some concerns about home education and I didn't mind setting the record straight, I had a hard time reading the letter from them. I've had typos, because we're all human, but I would hope that next time the OP would take the time to put their thoughts into a clear format so we could continue the discussion in a productive way.) I'm sorry I didn't clarify that on my previous posts. I was having a problem fitting my lengthy response into the allotted space, and the spam filter was kicking my butt. :P

Mar 04, 2009
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SERIOUSLY??
by: Anonymous

Is this a joke? I barely got past the first sentence or two with the amazing amount of spelling errors! (And not im-typing-too-fast-kind of errors but the I-lack an education kind)Seriously

If you seek to share your abundant 'knowledge' about how parents who home educate thier children are doing them an injustice educationally, please at least grab a dictionary and write in a coherent matter--(or I'll send over my 6 year old home educated child to help you spell the big words).

Gimme' a break!!

May 11, 2011
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??
by: Anonymous

Seriously, I cannot even read your post. Not only are there grammatical errors, but you are not even speaking proper English (Ebonics maybe?). It completely invalidates your opinion on the subject.

Feb 05, 2012
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Oh god
by: Anonymous

While I neither agree or disagree with your opinion, please at least have the decency to use correct grammar and spelling. This would result in a lot more understandable post.

Thank you!

Apr 23, 2012
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Why so defensive?
by: Tia

I think that all the above comments are arrogant and filled with pride. I'm all for home education but it's the community that is a turn off for me. All these comments only reinforce my thoughts.
Reguardless if this is a joke or, sadly, not, why would "well-educated" teachers attack and become so defensive about someone elses educational weaknesses? Such rude and ugly comments are not needed to "prove" why homeschooling isn't bad.

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